Thursday, November 17, 2016

Wrong winner (plurality reversal) elections in Canada

Hilary Clinton got at least 1% more of the popular vote than Trump, but lost to him.

This has happened at least 21 times in Canada. (Readers, please feel free to tell me any I missed.)

This is one good reason why Canada needs a fair and proportional voting system which fairly translates votes into seats in the House of Commons.

Federal:
1896: Charles Tupper’s Conservatives won 44.4% of the vote but got only 71 seats; Wilfrid Laurier’s Liberals won only 41.4% of the vote but got 117 seats.
1926: Arthur Meighen’s Conservatives won 45.3% of the vote but got only 91 seats; Mackenzie King’s Liberals won only 42.9% of the vote but got 116 seats.
1957: Louis St. Laurent’s Liberals won 42.3% of the vote but got only 105 seats; John Diefenbaker’s PCs won only 39.0% of the vote but got 112 seats.
1962: Lester Pearson’s Liberals won 37.4% of the vote but got only 99 seats; John Diefenbaker’s PCs won only 37.3% of the vote, but got 116 seats; 
1979: Pierre Trudeau’s Liberals won 40.1% of the vote but got only 114 seats, Joe Clark’s PCs won only 35.9% of the vote but got 136 seats.

Quebec:
1944: Adelard Godbout’s Liberals won 39.3% of the vote but got only 37 seats; Maurice Duplessis’ Union Nationale won only 38.0% of the vote but got 48 seats.
1966: Jean Lesage’s Liberals won 47.3% of the vote but got only 50 seats; Daniel Johnson’s Union Nationale won only 40.8% of the vote but got 56 seats.
1998: Jean Charest’s Liberals won 43.55% of the vote but got only 48 seats, Lucien Bouchard’s PQ won only 42.87% of the vote but got 76 seats.

Ontario:
1919: William Hearst’s Conservatives won 34.9% of the vote but got only 25 seats. The United Farmers won only 21.7% of the vote but got 44 seats.
1985: David Peterson’s Liberals won 37.9% of the vote but got only 48 seats; Frank Miller’s PCs won only 37.0% of the vote but got 52 seats

New Brunswick:

1952: John McNair’s Liberals won 49.2% of the vote but got only 16 seats; Hugh John Fleming’s PCs won only 48.9% of the vote but got 36 seats.
1970: Louis Robichaud’s Liberals won 48.6% of the vote but got only 26 seats; Richard Hatfield’s PCs won only 48.4% of the vote but got 32 seats. 
1974: Robert Higgins’ Liberals won 47.5% of the vote but got only 25 seats; Richard Hatfield’s PCs won only 46.9% of the vote but got 33 seats.
2006: Bernard Lord’s PCs won 47.5% of the vote but got only 26 seats; Shawn Graham’s Liberals won only 47.1% of the vote but got 29 seats. 

Saskatchewan:
1986: Allan Blakeney’s NDP won 45.2% of the vote but got only 25 seats; Grant Devine’s PCs won only 44.6% of the vote but got 38 seats. 
1999: Elwin Hermanson’s Saskatchewan Party won 39.6% of the vote but got only 25 seats; Roy Romanow’s NDP won only 38.7% of the vote but got 29 seats.

BC:
1996: Gordon Campbell’s Liberals won 41.8% of the vote but got only 33 seats; Glen Clark’s NDP won only 39.5% of the vote but got 39 seats.

Manitoba:
1922: Tobias Norris’ Liberals won 33.2% of the vote but got only 8 seats; the United Farmers (Progressives) won only 32.8% of the vote but got 28 seats
1945: Seymour Farmer’s CCF won 33.8% of the vote but got only 9 seats, the Liberal-Progressives won only 32.2% of the vote but got 25 seats.

Newfoundland and Labrador:
1989: Tom Rideout’s PCs won 47.6% of the vote but got only 21 seats; Clyde Wells’ Liberals won only 47.2% of the vote but got 31 seats. 

Nova Scotia:
1970: G. I. Smith’s PCs won 46.9% of the vote but got only 21 seats; Gerald Regan’s Liberals won only 46.1% of the vote but got 23 seats. 

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